Research

Research is an important part of Dogs Trust's work - it helps us ensure that are policies and practices are based in evidence, and we are doing the best we can for the dogs in our care. The research funded by Dogs Trust also has wider benefits for canine welfare. For example, we have funded research which helps us better understand risks for aggressive behaviour in dogs, understand the quantify the quality of life for dogs in our centres and validate a behaviour modification programme for separation anxiety. 

Some of our research findings

By Admin | research

Dogs Trust is committed to conducting and funding research which enhances dog welfare - but we also want to make sure that the results of studies are accessible so they have maximum impact on dog welfare. Check out the section below to read one example of research funded recently by Dogs Trust. The aim of this study was to better understand the occurrence of repetitive behaviours (such a spinning and tail chasing) in dogs.

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Current projects

By Admin | research

We fund a number of research projects through the Canine Welfare & International grant schemes. Generation Pup is a study following dogs throughout their lives.

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Funding research

By Admin | research

As well as providing practical solutions to canine welfare problems happening right now, we invest in securing better dog welfare for years to come, through the work of our Canine Welfare Grants Committee. We welcome grant applications from students , post-graduates and practicing vets and behaviourists for projects which will positively impact dog welfare, however we do not fund any research which requires a Home Office licence.

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Research into practice

By Rachel.Casey@dogstrust.org.uk | research behaviour e-collars aversive reward policy

The research we carry out at Dogs Trust is conducted to ensure that our policies and practices are based in evidence, and we are doing the best we can for the dogs in our care. Research also helps inform the wider work we do, for example ensuring that that give the best advice to members of the public, governments and other stakeholders about the behaviour and welfare of dogs. A great example of this is the work carried out by the Public Affairs team, who have used research on the use of different training methods used in dogs to lobby Parliament and the devolved assemblies to improve dog welfare.

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